In Divorce, Information Reigns Supreme, not Moral High Ground

As the old saying goes, “sometimes bad things happen to good people.” You may have always lived your life being as kind to others as you possibly could, being open and honest with everyone, going out of your way to help others even when they didn’t ask, and always following through when you gave your word.

You could be the type of person who your loved ones would describe as being the nicest, most honorable person in the world. That being said, you could still find yourself involved in a bitter divorce, having to fight for what you know is right.

The word “fight” is very important there. Sometimes divorces go smoothly, and everything ends up according to plan, but more often than not, there is some struggling, arguing, and negotiation that comes into play. When that happens, it is crucial to remember that it is not enough to simply have right on your side; you need to have “right” written down on paper, with hard evidence backing it up.

The judge will only see you for a few small, pressure-filled windows, and will likely never know that you are the most trustworthy human being to ever be born. They cannot take anything you say at your word, but rather, they need the proof, the documentation, and the indisputable facts in front of them.

When it comes to cooperative divorces, it can be tricky. Having to maintain the peace while gathering as much information as possible to support your particular side is not easy, but you have to assume your spouse is doing the same thing. While no one wants to be dragged down into an emotion-wrought war of a divorce proceeding, the fact is that a divorce filing is basically petitioning getting the court’s help in dividing and dissolving a marriage as fairly and evenly as possible.

You want to be sure you put as much power as you can into the court’s hands, so that they can do their job as effectively as possible. Information is what rules the day, then.