50% of Marriages End in Divorce. Oh Really?

For as long as many of us can remember, we have been told time and time again that 50% of marriages will end in divorce. One out of every two marriages will fail. This has become a commonly accepted truth in our society. But after years of researching the divorce rate, former Wall Street analyst Shaunti Feldhahn discovered that just as divorce is complicated, research on divorce is complicated, too. Turns out that 50% divorce figure hasn’t been true for a long time.

She found that for first-time marriages, the divorce rate was closer to 20-25%, on average. Feldhahn claims that if a marriage survives the first 5 years, the couple has an almost 80% chance of lasting at least another 5 years together. She also found that, on average, 65% of remarried people are still married to their second spouse, and that the remaining 35% is not only couples that divorced. The remaining 35% also includes everyone who was married to their second spouse until one spouse died.

Feldhahn believes that the 50% divorce figure may have come from projections of what researchers predicted the divorce rate would be following the climbing divorce rates in the 1970s and 1980s. But, according to Feldhahn, the divorce rate is actually dropping each year. The dropping divorce rate is due to several factors, including couples waiting longer to marry, cohabiting first and breaking up rather than marrying, fewer people getting married overall, and a greater acceptance of single-parent households, among other things.

If you are getting divorced, it doesn’t matter what the current divorce rate is; what matters is finding a reliable, experienced family law attorney to fight for your rights, especially as they relate to your children, your property, alimony, and tax consequences. DeVoe Law Firm can help you from inadvertently giving up certain rights. DeVoe Law Firm will be on your side from the initial paperwork to mediation to the courtroom, if necessary. You can count on DeVoe Law Firm to look out for your best interests and to aggressively represent your case.

Read the original article here.